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Tag:Mark Sanchez
Posted on: January 31, 2011 7:40 pm
Edited on: January 31, 2011 7:43 pm
 

Brian Schottenheimer

Alright, I've got to hand it to Pittsburgh.

There's really nothing to say. The Jets were lucky to have gotten back in the game. The Steelers almost witnessed a little Déjà vu, but New York just couldn't top their first half performance... now, let's get to the point.

Brian Schottenheimer, New York Jets offensive coordinator. Here's a guy, who's given all of the tools for his offense. A quarterback in Mark Sanchez, who may not be the greatest thing out there, but he's developing into a great thrower and leader for this team.

A backfield consisting of future Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee LaDainian Tomlinson, Shonn Greene, a potential star, and the best fullback in the game in Tony Richardson. Not to mention two rookies the Jets snagged in the 2010 draft - fullback John Conner, and ex-USC star Joe McKnight at half back.

An above average receiving core. Super Bowl XLIII MVP Santonio Holmes. Jerricho Cotchery, who has great hands. Braylon Edwards, who has a great height advantage. Brad Smith, a very elusive/versatile weapon. Speaking of Smith, he is a perfect fit for the Wildcat formation. Not only is he speedy, but in his days in college at Missouri, he was their starting quarterback. But does New York run a successful Wildcat offense? No. Why? Because they run a one-dimensional Wildcat offense. All they do is run the ball. Even if Smith was not an ex-quarterback, you have to let the guy throw the ball.

They have a great weapon at tight end, Dustin Keller, who Mark Sanchez is very fond of throwing to. New York also has arguably the best offensive line in the entire NFL. Nick Mangold at center, D'Brickashaw Ferguson and Damien Woody at tackle, and Brandon Moore and Matt Slauson at guard - an amazing group of football players. They also have depth at the o-line position, with guys like Wayne Hunter and Vladimir Ducasse.

All of these great players to work with. A great team on paper. What's the problem? The man calling the plays. Given the information provided, it's obvious as to what the problem is.

He creates horrible game plans. It takes him the first half of games, to realize that the offense lies in the running game. All year, it has been the same thing. Little run in the first half, and then run run run in the second, and you wonder why New York's had so many 4th quarter comebacks!

I was hoping coming into this game that he'd choose to run the ball, but boy were my hopes demolished. One total yard of rushing offense in the first half. No typo - one. That's just ridiculous. I'm aware of Pittsburgh rush defense, but you also have to be aware that without the run game, you cannot win. An example - that game.

Greene on the first play of the second half ran for 23 times the amount they ran for in the entire first half.

If you watched the game you also would've noticed the Jets on the goal line in the 4th quarter, a result of a nine minute drive. Horrible play calling on the goal line, horrible. Instead of pounding the ball in, he decided to throw the ball two times in a row, on second and third. Not only was the choice of play horrible, but it was executed horribly. On one of the plays, Sanchez just whipped the ball at a defender. Then, on fourth down, he decided to resort to the run, and with two yards to go for a score, it was stuffed. Basically, I would've done the exact opposite of what he called. If you're down by multiple scores in the 4th and waste nine minutes on a single drive - you'd better score some points on that drive.

Anyways, that's my take on what New York needs to do in order to make it to the big game next year. If not fire Brian Schottenheimer, let him know he needs to run the ball. He is clearly the problem and the weak point in the Jets offense.



 
 
 
 
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